Acquisition of the land and buildings from HPD

On December 6th, 1994, HPD sold 13 East 3rd Street (Block 459, Lot 43) to the CLT.  The building had been vacant, and was ULURPed and renovated in the early 1990s.  After this initial sale, HPD conducted a ULURP in 1995 of all of the 19 buildings earmarked for the MHA program.  The MHA project faced political opposition from our former Councilman, Antonio Pagan, but CSC and the MHA organized support from the City Council, and it was approved by all but two members of the City Council, Antonio Pagan and a Republican from Staten Island.

With the authorization of the sale of the land and buildings approved, and renovation of another 6 buildings completed, HPD scheduled a sale of nine (9) city-owned buildings on June 28th, 1996.  The buildings included 13 Stanton Street, 83 Second Avenue, 67, 69 and 71 East 4th Street, 58-60 East 4th Street and 21, 23 and 25 East 3rd Street.

After the completion of the renovation of additional buildings, HPD scheduled a closing for six (6) more buildings: 56, 57, 64 and 65 East 4th Street and 9 and 27 East 3rd Street in November, 1999.

The next three buildings to be renovated were 73, 76 and 77 East 4th Street.  They were renovated.   73 and 75 East 4th St. were transferred by HPD to the MHA II on June 28, 2001.  77 E. 4th St. was transferred to the MHA II by HPD on June 27, 2002.

In the late 1990s, HPD placed 89 East 3rd Street in the Tenant Interim Lease (TIL) Program.  The tenants had been in the program before, and had endured internal conflict, and did not want to be in the program again.  With organizing assistance from the Cooper Square Committee, they petitioned HPD to allow them to join the MHA program.  After a protracted struggle, they succeeded in getting HPD to approve their request.  In the early 2000s, the building underwent substantial renovation, during which time the tenants were temporarily relocated to other MHA buildings, and the building was completed in 2007.  On March 21, 2008, HPD sold the building to the MHA.

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Managing low-income co-ops in NYC's Lower East Side